FEATURED ARTIST

Alake Shilling

ALAKE SHILLING

Alake Shilling’s solo exhibition, The Hippest Trip in America - By Land, Air and Sea, runs until October 30, 2021 at Jeffrey Deitch New York. The title comes from Nelson George’s 2014 book on the prominent television show Soul Train.

The exhibition features seven paintings in the main Grand Street gallery, and seven ceramic sculptures in the Grand Street storefront. The oil paintings are textured with crumbled Styrofoam, nail polish and glitter. The sculptures and paintings reference pop culture from Shilling’s childhood and embody feelings that are often relegated as abject. Shilling questions such abjections while simultaneously revealing such pre- and overdeterminations when encountering the visual and haptic.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2021

    Best Buddies

    Glazed ceramic and enamel paint
    14 x 25 x 16 inches

  • 2021

    Buggy Bear on a Star Studded Beach Adventure

    Oil paint, glitter, sand, styrofoam balls and salt on canvas
    60 x 72 x 2.5 inches

  • 2021

    Installation views, Alake Shilling: The Hippest Trip in America - By Land, Air and Sea

    Jeffrey Deitch, New York, 2021

  • 2021

    Installation views, Alake Shilling: The Hippest Trip in America - By Land, Air and Sea

    Jeffrey Deitch, New York, 2021

FEATURED ARTIST

Basma Al-Sharif

BASMA AL-SHARIF

Basma Al-Sharif is an Artist/Filmmaker of Palestinian origin, raised between France, the US and the Gaza Strip. She has a BFA and an MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Basma developed her practice nomadically and works between cinema and installation centering on the human condition in relation to shifting geopolitical landscapes and natural environments. Major exhibitions include: Solo shows at CCA and MOCA Toronto, Modern Mondays at MOMA, the Whitney Biennial, les Rencontres d'Arles, les Module at the Palais de Tokyo, Here and Elsewhere at the New Museum, Al Riwaq Biennial Palestine, The Berlin Documentary Forum, the Sharjah Biennial, and Manifesta 8. Basma is represented by Galerie Imane Farés in Paris, distributed by Video Data Bank and Arsenal, and is based in Berlin. 

Basma Al-Sharif is featured in the “Semipublic Intellectual” issue of the Quarterly Journal.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • Still from We Began by Measuring Distance, 2009
    19:06, Color, Stereo, 4:3, DV video
    Image courtesy of the artist

  • 2007

    Still from Everywhere was the Same

    11:38, Color, Stereo, 4:3, DV video

  • 2007

    Still from Everywhere was the Same

    11:38, Color, Stereo, 4:3, DV video

  • 2009

    Still from We Began by Measuring Distance

    19:06, Color, Stereo, 4:3, DV video

FEATURED ARTIST

Jayce Salloum

JAYCE SALLOUM

Filmmaker Jayce Salloum has lectured, published, and exhibited at various local and international venues from unnamed storefronts in his downtown eastside Vancouver neighbourhood to institutions such as the Musée du Louvre, Museum of Modern Art, Guggenheim Museum, Centre Georges Pompidou, National Gallery of Canada, Bienal De La Havana, Sharjah Biennial, Biennale of Sydney and the Rotterdam International Film Festival. You can view his work at Instagram.com/jaycesalloum and https://vimeo.com/salloum.

untitled part 7.2 (from the installation: the heart that has no love/pain/generosity is not a heart) (2010) is filmed at Laisa-e-Maarifat (Marefat School), Dasht-e-Barchi, Kabul, Afghanistan. During the Marefat high school morning assembly, high school girls shift in with a few boys, while faculty enters the school courtyard at 5:30AM. They gather, lining up while Sufi songs play in the background. They begin to sing their school song, “the heart that has no love, pain, or generosity is not a heart”, and subsequently walk up the stairs to their classes.

Jayce Salloum is featured in the “Semipublic Intellectual” issue of the Quarterly Journal.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2001

    still from untitled part 3a: occupied territories

    “I can’t keep quiet about things that are wrong..”, Nameh Hussein Suleiman (in Baddawi refugee ‘camp', near Tripoli, Lebanon)
    23:00

  • 2010 (2008)

    untitled part 7.2 from: دلِ که سوز ندارد, دلِ نیست (the heart that has no love/pain/generosity is not a heart)

    Videoloop from the installation: دلِ که سوز ندارد, دلِ نیست (the heart that has no love/pain/generosity is not a heart
)
    Dari/Farsi subtitled in English
    14:13

  • 2002

    still from untitled part 3b: (as if) beauty never ends...

    orchid, "What about Khalil, Fadl and Abdullah..”, Abdel Majid Fadl Ali Hassan (in Bourg al Barajinah refugee ‘camp', near Beirut, Lebanon)
    11:22

  • 1999-2001

    still from untitled part 1: everything and nothing

    “I left everything and I left Nothing”, Soha Bechara
    40:00, Color, Sound

FEATURED ARTIST

The Going Away Present

THE GOING AWAY PRESENT

The Going Away Present, organized by Kristina Kite and Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer, is on view from July 24 - August 21, 2021 at Kristina Kite Gallery in Los Angeles. The massive group exhibition celebrates and bids goodbye to the influential art critic and beloved pedagogue Bruce Hainley as he leaves Los Angeles to teach at Rice University. The group exhibition, comprised of 49 artists and 18 writers, includes Owen Fu, Mike Kuchar, Lisa Lapinski, John Waters, Dennis Cooper, Aram Moshayedi, among others.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2021

    The Going Away Present, installation view

    Organized by Kristina Kite and Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer
    Kristina Kite Gallery, Los Angeles

  • 2021

    Daisy Oracle

    Kelly Akashi
    Hand-blown glass and bronze
    32 x 6 x 12 inches

  • 2021

    
En revenant du marché avec Mona

    Malak El Zanaty Varichon & Mona Varichon
    
HD video. color, sound
TRT 4:19

  • 2014

    Rain Man, Havana

    Gary Indiana
    Digital video 
TRT 5:59

FEATURED ARTIST

What We Left Unfinished

WHAT WE LEFT UNFINISHED

Mariam Ghani's What We Left Unfinished is a probing and engrossing case study in censorship, authoritarianism, and political art. Thirty years after the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan and the subsequent civil war, during a new era of political uncertainty for the embattled nation, What We Left Unfinished looks closely at the era of state-funded Afghan filmmaking during the country’s Communist era, bringing together dozens of writers, actors, and filmmakers to discuss five unfinished, unedited projects produced between 1978 and 1991. The film was selected by the Berlin Film Festival, DOC NYC, and Il Cinema Ritrovato. What We Left Unfinished will be in US theaters and virtual theatrical release starting Friday August 6th.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2019

    Khalek Halil’s unfinished film Almas-e Siah (The Black Diamond)

    from What We Left Unfinished (Indexical Films, 2019)
    Afghanistan, Qatar, USA
    Written & Directed by: Mariam Ghani
    Starring: Latif Ahmadi, Jawanshir Haidari, Asadollah Aram
    71 minutes
    Language: Dari, English

  • 2019

    Khalek Halil’s unfinished film Almas-e Siah (The Black Diamond)

    from What We Left Unfinished (Indexical Films, 2019)
    Afghanistan, Qatar, USA
    Written & Directed by: Mariam Ghani
    Starring: Latif Ahmadi, Jawanshir Haidari, Asadollah Aram
    71 minutes
    Language: Dari, English

  • 2019

    Still from What We Left Unfinished (Indexical Films, 2019)

    Afghanistan, Qatar, USA
    Written & Directed by: Mariam Ghani
    Starring: Latif Ahmadi, Jawanshir Haidari, Asadollah Aram
    71 minutes
    Language: Dari, English

  • 2019

    Khalek Halil’s unfinished film Almas-e Siah (The Black Diamond)

    from What We Left Unfinished (Indexical Films, 2019)
    Afghanistan, Qatar, USA
    Written & Directed by: Mariam Ghani
    Starring: Latif Ahmadi, Jawanshir Haidari, Asadollah Aram
    71 minutes
    Language: Dari, English

FEATURED ARTIST

Bill Gunn

BILL GUNN

Artists Space, in collaboration with an organizing committee comprised of Bill Gunn collaborators and scholars, presents Till They Listen: Bill Gunn Directs America. The comprehensive gallery exhibition includes a series of public programs celebrating the life and towering, multi-faceted work of the filmmaker, playwright, novelist, and actor Bill Gunn (1929–1989). As a Black artist working simultaneously in Hollywood and the New York theatre world, Gunn persistently struggled to produce his work as a writer and filmmaker, and these hardships are reflected in both his art and his archive. Three decades after his death, Bill Gunn’s work has begun to gain long overdue visibility through film retrospectives, restorations and increased availability of his published writings. Adding to the recent scholarship around Gunn’s work, this exhibition elucidates Gunn’s profound artistic vision through an unprecedented gathering of archival materials from both private collections and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture’s unparalleled holdings, most exhibited for the first time. This curated selection of ephemera, media, literature, and original artworks offers a complex and intimate portrait of Gunn’s seminal output, with a focus on his many unrealized projects.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • Installation view

    Till They Listen: Bill Gunn Directs America
    Artists Space, June 5 – August 21, 2021

  • c. 1982

    Installation view featuring contact sheets from Losing Ground

    Till They Listen: Bill Gunn Directs America
    Artists Space, June 5 – August 21, 2021

  • c. 1973

    Installation view

    Till They Listen: Bill Gunn Directs America
    Artists Space, June 5 – August 21, 2021

  • c.1973

    Installation view featuring various ephemera from Ganja & Hess

    Till They Listen: Bill Gunn Directs America
    Artists Space, June 5 – August 21, 2021

FEATURED ARTIST

Lost Weekend

LOST WEEKEND

Lost Weekend is an exhibition on view at Galerie Allen and Yvon Lambert in Paris until July 31, 2021. The exhibition title is borrowed from the name John Lennon gave to an 18-month period where he plummeted to personal lows while reaching creative highs. The two galleries had the desire to collaborate and consolidate ideas of exchange between geography, generations and intention. Their version of the well seasoned Mail Art exhibition places a metaphorical fork in the road: 2 artworks leaving an artist’s studio in one part of the world and arriving in Paris to be split between two spaces while symbiotically resonating between each location. Artists in the group show include Kersti Jan Werdal, Etel Adnan, James Benning, Moyra Davey, Simone Fattal, Matt Paweski, and Ryoko Sekiguchi, amongst others.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • Untitled

    by Etel Adnan
    10 x 8 inches
    painting on watercolor paper

  • Untitled

    by James Benning
    12 x 8 inches

  • 2021

    Light 48a

    by Kersti Jan Werdal
    Lightjet C-Print on glossy paper
    5 x 7 inches
    Edition 1 of 1

  • 2021

    UNTITLED (CAFÉ) 1

    by Moyra Davey
    C-Print, Tape, Postage, Ink
    12 x 18 inches

    "When thinking of this show, I looked up the circle of latitude each gallery sits on, and discovered Paris lies on the 48th Parallel North. This is the same latitude as the Olympic Peninsula in the Northwest corner of the United States, an area I spend significant time in, a state I was born and raised. This line connects all locations in the world by an imagined circle. I took a drive up to Neah Bay, Makah Tribal land that is also the furthest northwest point of the state, with the intention of making a picture of the sea in front of me, and another of the forest behind me. I made these pictures, and when I developed the film discovered that two negatives were exposed from the early light that morning, these are the images I chose to print. I intercepted the color with my own interpretation based on the feeling I had when standing in this place."

FEATURED ARTIST

Alexandra Barth

ALEXANDRA BARTH

Chris Sharp Gallery in Los Angeles presents the US solo debut of the Slovakian artist Alexandra Barth. The show runs until July 31, 2021.

Alexandra Barth (b. 1989 Malacky, Slovakia; lives and works in Bratislava) received her degree from the Academy of Fine Arts and Design in Bratislava in 2013. A selection of solo exhibitions have been held at Phoinix, Bratislava (2020), Urban gallery, Pescara (2020), Hotdock project space, Bratislava (2019). Recent group exhibitions include Like a picture, Photoport, Bratislava (2020), The Elevator, Temporary Parapet, Bratislava (2019) and MDŽ, White&Weiss, Bratislava (2017).

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2021

    Yellow Table

    Acrylic on canvas
    47.2 x 74.8 inches

  • 2021

    Blue Pillow

    Acrylic on canvas
    47.2 x 35.4 inches

  • 2020

    Leaves

    Acrylic on canvas
    59 x 47.2 inches

  • 2021

    Tablecloth

    Acrylic on canvas
    31.5 x 23.6 inches

FEATURED ARTIST

Hear before hereafter

HEAR BEFORE HEREAFTER

Hear before hereafter is a film program running from June 30 to July 7, 2021 online at Los Angeles Nomadic Division (LAND). The film program features works by Jayce Salloum, Akram Zaatari, Christelle Oyiri, Roula Nassar, Reynaldo Rivera, and Basma Alsharif. Each work is posited as a music video where image follows sound. The program encourages a listening as watching experience.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2014

    Still from Deep Sleep

    by Basma Alsharif
    00:12:45
    Greece / Malta / Palestine
    HD video

  • 2014

    Still from Deep Sleep

    by Basma Alsharif
    00:12:45
    Greece / Malta / Palestine
    HD video

  • 2008, 2020

    still from untitled part 9: this time

    6:13
    Afghanistan
    HDV
    Video credits:
    Director/camera/sound/producer: Jayce Salloum
    Featuring: Ahmed Jan, Mehdi Khan Agha, Hussain Ali
    Collaborator & final translation: Khadim Ali
    Project commissioner: Haema Sivanesan
    On site translator: Muzafar Sanji
    Driver (Afghanistan): Mohammad Zia

    Out of the mouths of rural boys, finding the incomparable Mulla Nasrudin in Afghanistan.
    After my first year of art school in San Francisco in 1978, I quit, and headed to the Banff School of Fine Arts to do a year long residency program. The instructor Hu Hohn got me hooked on Sufi stories such as, "The Exploits and Subtleties of the incomparable Mulla Nasrudin". Mulla Nasrudin is a Sufi wise-fool, trickster like figure. These books were chock full of funny little contemplative meditation stories. I would read these riding the bus at night and such, to get me through trying days. Later in 2008, I'm in the central highlands of Afghanistan, in Bamiyan, where the colossal Buddha statutes were destroyed by the Taliban. A stark, arid, severe, beautiful landscape, people scrapping by, subsistence farming, much like my grandparents did in Syria. I'm filming scruffy little country boys in a new school built by Western troops. The boys are speaking Hazaragi (a Farsi dialect), via my translator but never having the time to translate responses. At the end of each session, we ask them to tell a joke or a song, something other than the conversation we’ve tried to record. Six months later when I’m back home and the rough transcript translations have been sent to me from Quetta, I discover, lo and behold, then and there were the very same Sufi stories – thirty years later – being told by these scruffy little country boys at Laisa-e-Aali Zukoor boys school, Bamiyan, Hazarajat, Afghanistan. These few days I’ve been working with my Afghan collaborator, Khadim Ali, he’s based in Sydney currently. We’re trying to work through the time zones, which goes hand in hand with the other displacements of the overarching pandemic time and space. Many thanks to the impeccable Khadim Ali, and to the translator and eternal wunderkind Muzafar Sanji; to Mohammad Zia, our stalwart driver and safe-keeper who deftly transported us over unspeakable rutted goat trails aka roads; and to all who shared with us a mat to rest or sleep on, stories, food, curious minds, and warm hearts.

  • 1995

    still from Mourning Images

    by Akram Zaatari
    00:06:10
    Lebanon
    BetacamSP video

FEATURED ARTIST

The Beatitudes of Malibu

THE BEATITUDES OF MALIBU

The Beatitudes of Malibu, at David Kordansky Gallery in Los Angeles, is an exhibition of works by more than 40 artists and poets that respond to, depict, question, or are inspired by landscapes of all kinds. The exhibition is on view through July 2, 2021.

The Beatitudes of Malibu borrows its title from a poem of the same name by Rowan Ricardo Phillips; in the poem’s eight parts, the poet engages in a series of encounters with natural, social, and aesthetic landscapes associated with Los Angeles, but also with the full spectrum of myths, narratives, and allusions these landscapes elicit. 

On the occasion of the exhibition and its accompanying poetry booklet, David Kordansky Gallery is hosting a virtual reading with poets Tongo Eisen-Martin (also reading Bob Kaufman), Gabriela Jauregui, Ann Lauterbach, and Cedar Sigo on Thursday, June 17 at 5 pm PT via Zoom.

The Beatitudes of Malibu employs a broad range of approaches to the landscape genre by bringing together artists whose paintings, drawings, sculptures, photographs, and poems are born of divergent—and often conflicting—legacies. Freely mixed, for example, are abstract and representational depictions of the natural and urban worlds. But on an even deeper level, the totality of the works on view juxtaposes a number of entirely distinct positions vis-à-vis the environments that make up a “landscape.”   

These distinctions can be geographical and generational. Lauren Halsey’s wall-based “funk mound,” is a vivid representation of what South Central Los Angeles looks and feels like both in physical reality and in the heart and mind; its realism transcends the visual realm and suggests that landscapes have an internal dimension. Other works acknowledge and confront the construction of landscape as a social invention. In mixed-media photographs by Sky Hopinka, handwritten text is etched around the edges of each image, offering reflections on what it means to be in relation to the land on emotional, psychological, and political terms; landscapes are shown to be places where individual human experiences intersect with larger forces, and where time and physical space are relative quantities. A painting by Raul Guerrero addresses the competing narrative strata that lie beneath the surface of any image of place, and pays particular attention to the ways in which Indigenous cultures, ongoing legacies of colonialism, and popular aesthetic forms populate the landscapes of the Southern California imaginary.

With respect to the various interpretations of landscape by the artists and poets featured in The Beatitudes of Malibu, we at David Kordansky Gallery would like to acknowledge that our spaces were built and physically reside on the traditional homelands once known as Tovaangar (Los Angeles basin, Southern Channel Islands) and home to the Tongva people—later referred to as Gabrieleño and Fernandeño by Spanish colonizers. We understand that acknowledging the gallery’s occupation on Tovaangar homeland calls for us to commit to continuing to learn how to be better stewards of the land we inhabit. In all facets of our work, we remain committed to creating inclusive and equitable spaces by implementing policies and practices that promote diversity and sustain an environment of mutual accountability.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2020

    They don't care about us and laugh when we turn on each other. I promised myself, no memories, no similes, still, I am deeply troubled at heart.

    by Sky Hopinka
    Inkjet print and etching
    17 x 17 inches
    Framed:
    19 x 18 5/8 x 2 inches
    Edition 2 of 3, with 2 AP

  • 2020

    I think of my home tonight. I don't have any resolutions, but I've felt so much through these streets, these neighborhoods. This land and this Land hold so much, and this pain and this Pain call for salves we already have, still needing to be wrapped and poulticed.

    by Sky Hopinka
    Inkjet print and etching
    17 x 17 inches
    Framed:
    19 x 18 5/8 x 2 inches
    Edition 2 of 3, with 2 AP

  • 2021

    may we bang you?

    by Lauren Halsey
    White cement, wood, and mixed media
    87 x 83 x 50 inches

  • 2021

    Untitled

    by Huma Bhabha
    Ink, acrylic, pastel, and collage on paper
    35 3/8 x 23 3/4 inches
    Framed:
    40 x 28 1/4 x 2 inches

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